George Sansome

by George Sansome

/
  • Compact Disc (CD) + Digital Album

    Includes 8-page booklet with information on the songs and featuring art and photography by Mars West.

    Includes unlimited streaming of George Sansome via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
    ships out within 2 days

      £10 GBP

     

  • Streaming + Download

    Includes unlimited streaming via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
    Purchasable with gift card

      £8 GBP  or more

     

1.
Collier Lass 03:48
My name’s Polly Parker, I come over from Worsley My father and mother work in the coal mine. Our family’s large, we have got seven children So I am obliged to work in the same mine. As this is my fortune I know you’ll feel sorry That in such employment my days I shall pass. I keep up my spirits, I sing and look merry Although I am but a poor collier lass. By the greatest of dangers each day I’m surrounded; I hang in the air by a rope or a chain. The mine may fall in, I may be killed or wounded, May perish by damp or the fire of the train. And what would you do if it weren’t for our labour? In wretched starvation your days you would pass, While we could provide you with life’s greatest blessing - Then do not despise the poor collier lass. Now all the day long you may say we are buried, Deprived of the light and the warmth of the sun; And oft times at nights from our bed we are hurried: The water is in and then barefoot we run. And though we go ragged with dust on our faces, As kind and as free as the best we’ll be found; Our hearts are as clean as your lords, in fine places, Although we’re poor colliers that work underground. I’m growing up fast, now, one way or another; There’s a collier lad strangely runs in my mind. In spite of the talking of father and mother, I think I should marry if he was inclined. But should he prove surly and would not befriend me, Another and better chance may come to pass. My friends here, I know, unto him will commend me, And I’ll be no longer a collier lass. So what would you do if it weren’t for our labour? In wretched starvation your days you would pass, While we could provide you with life’s greatest blessing - So do not despise the poor collier lass.
2.
On the fourteenth of February we sailed from the land In the bold Princess Royal bound for Newfoundland We had forty brave seamen for our ship’s company And boldly from the eastward to the westward sailed we And boldly from the eastward to the westward sailed we We had not been long a-sailing, scarce two days or three When the man from our mizzen strange sails he did see She came bearing down all after us for to see what we were And under her mizzen black colours she did wear Oh no then cried our captain, what shall we do now? Here comes a bold pirate for to rob us I know Oh no cried the first mate, that will not be so We’ll shake out a reef me boys and away from her we’ll go At last this bold pirate she hove alongside And with loud-speaking trumpet, whence come you? She cried Our captain standing aft me lads, he answered her so We’ve come from fair London town, to Cairo we shall go Then lay up your course sail and heave your ship to I do have some letters for to send home by you I will lay up my course sail and I’ll heave my ship to But that’s home all in the harbour, and not alongside of you They chased us to the eastward all the livelong day And they chased us to the eastward but couldn’t get no way They fired shots all after us, but none did prevail And the bold Princess Royal soon showed them her tail At last then cried our captain, the pirate he is gone Go down to your grog boy, go down everyone Go down to your grog me lads, and be of good cheer For while we have sea-room, bold boys never fear.
3.
Australia 04:20
Come all you young fellows, wheresoe’er you may be Come listen a while to my story: When I was a young lad, my age seventeen I ought to been serving Victoria our queen, But those hard-hearted judges, oh how cruel they be To send us poor lads to Australia I fell in with a damsel, she was handsome and gay I neglected my work more and more every day; And to keep her like a lady I went on the highway And for that I was sent to Australia Now the judges they stand with their whips in their hands They drive us like horses to plough up the land; You should see us poor fellows, working in the jail yard Oh how hard is our fate in Australia. Australia, Australia, I would ne’er see you more Worn out with the fever, cast down to death’s door; But should I live to see, oh say, seven years more, I would then say adieu to Australia.
4.
As I roved out one fine spring day Down by the green bushes I chanced for to stray, I spied a fair damsel, she appeared like a queen, And she spreading her clothes on the bleaches so green. So he then drew up near her and this he did say: “You are the first that e’er I did see; It’s three years or better since it ran in my mind That we would get married if you were inclined.” To get married, to get married, I think I’m too young, Besides all you young men have a false flattering tongue, My father and mother would be angry with me, If I’d marry a rover, a rover like thee. So this young man then stood up and he walked away, Saying: “You may get better wherever they may be. The sky it looks cloudy, I think it will rain.” So they shook hands and they parted on the bleaches so green. Come back, bonny laddie, and say you’ll be mine, The words you have spoke they have altered my mind. If you’ve altered your mind, love, it’s now all in vain; I’ll be courting some other on the bleaches so green. Some marry for riches, it’s a proud hearted way More marry for beauty, it’s a flower will decay But if ever I get married it’s bound to be seen, The one that proves true is the one that wants me.
5.
Boney he's away from his warring and fighting He is gone to the place that he never can delight in He may sit now and tell of the scenes he has seen a’ While forlorn he does morn, on the Isle of St. Helena. No more at St. Cloud will he appear in great splendour Nor go forth with his crowds like some great Alexander He may sigh to the winds by the great Mount Diana With his eyes o’er the waves that surround St. Helena. Now Louisa she weeps for her husband’s departure She dreams while she sleeps and she awakes brokenhearted Not a friend to condole; even those that might they winna And she mourns while she thinks on the Isle of St. Helena. The rude rushing waves all its shores round are washing And the white billows roll; the wild rocks they’re a-dashing He may look upon the moon and think of his Louisa With his heart full of woe on the Isle of St. Helena. Now you that have great wealth, beware of great ambition For some decree of fate soon may change your condition Be ye steadfast in time, for what’s to come ye kenna; Maybe your race will end on the Isle of St. Helena
6.
Brother workers, cease your labour Lay your files and hammers by Listen while a brother neighbour Sings a cutler’s destiny - How upon a good Saint Monday, Sitting by the smithy fire, Telling what’s been done on Sunday And in cheerful mirth conspire Soon we hear the trap-door rise up, On the ladder stands his wife: “Damn thee, Jack, I’ll dust thy eyes up, Thou leads a plaguey drunken life: Here thou sits instead of working, With thy pitcher on thy knee Curse thee, thou’d be always shirking, I would slave myself for thee.” “Ah! Thou great, fat, idle devil, Now I see thy goings on; Here thou sits all day to revel, Never a scrap of work you’ve done; If thou canst but get thy tankard Thou neither thinks o’ wark nor me: ‘Od burn thee, I was sorely hampered When I married a rogue like thee.” Now she speaks with motion quicker Than his boring stick at a Friday’s pace; She throws the generous sparkling liquor With all her fury in his face His eyes, his apron, and his breeches, His shirt sleeves are drenched with ale. Something bad his dear bewitches, Again to vex us with her tale. “Prithee, look here, all the forenoon Thou has wasted with thy idle ways; When do you mean to get your sours done? Master he wants them in today; You know I hate to broil and quarrel, But I’ve neither soap nor tea; Od burn thee, Jack, forsake thy barrel, Or never more I’ll lie with thee.” Still upon that good Saint Monday, Sitting by the smithy fire, Telling what’s been done on Sunday And in cheerful mirth conspire Now once more on joys he’s thinking, Since hard scolding’s tired his wife; The course is clear, he’ll have some drink in, And toast a jovial cutler’s life.
7.
As I walked out one May morning Down by the riverside, It’s there I spied a fisherman Come rolling down the tide. (It’s there I spied a fisherman Come rolling down the tide.) Good morning to you, bold fisherman, Good morning he did say What brought you down so far from home, So early in the morn? (What brought you down so far from home, So early in the morn?) Then he pulled off his morning gown And throwed it on the ground; And then I spied three chains of gold All round his neck hang down. (And then I spied three chains of gold All round his neck hang down.) Down on my bended knees I fell Crying: Pardon, pardon me In calling you a fisherman Come rolling down the sea (In calling you a fisherman Come rolling down the sea) Then rise up, rise up, said he No offence thou’st given to me In calling me a bold fisherman Come rolling down the sea. (In calling me a bold fisherman Come rolling down the sea.) I’ll take you to some church, my dear, And married we shall be And you shall have your bold fisherman To row you on the sea. (And you shall have your bold fisherman To row you on the sea.)
8.
As a soldier was a-walking all on the broad highway, Being weary of travelling for many a long long day, Oh, he met a lovely woman with a baby in her arms, Who that she kissed and said, “I wish your father would return.” “Good morning, lovely woman, I'm proud to meet you here With that sweet baby in your arms that you do love so dear. Oh, I think I know the father and you before I've seen, Don't you remember the day, my dear, you wore the gown of green? “Oh it's many the battle have I fought all on the raging main And many battles have I fought in Portugal and Spain. But it's now that I return again with plenty of gold in store; I mean to make you my lawful bride and rove abroad no more. “So come let us buy the licence all on this very day And then we will get married, love, without any more delay. With our pretty prattling baby such pleasures may be seen That you may never regret the day you wore the gown of green.”
9.
One morning, one morning, one morning in May I heard a poor soldier lamenting and say I heard a poor soldier lamenting and mourn I am a rebel soldier and far from my home. It’s grapeshot and it’s musket, and the cannons that lumber loud There’s many a mangled body, a blanket for their shroud There’s many a mangled body left on the field alone I am a rebel soldier and far from my home. I’ll eat when I’m hungry and drink when I’m dry If the Yankees don’t kill me I’ll live until I die If the Yankees don’t kill me and cause my heart to mourn I am a rebel soldier and far from my home. Here’s a bottle of good old brandy and a bottle of ginger wine You drink unto your true love, just while I mourn for mine You drink unto your true love while I am left alone I am a rebel soldier and far from my home. I’ll build me a scaffold on some green mountain high Where the wild geese can see me as they do pass me by Where the wild geese can see me and hear my sad, sad moan I am a rebel soldier and far from my home
10.
Abroad as I was walking just as ‘twas growing night, The moon was overclouded and the stars did give no light; I heard the cuckoo talking and the nightingale did say: I shall see my love no more for he’s gone far away. And it’s when shall I get married? Hey ho, not I, For my heart does lie so heavy since my love is gone away. I can travel up, my love, and I can travel down, I can travel London city all round and all round, While the drums they do beat, love, and the fifes do sweetly play, And so plainly they all tell me that my love’s gone far away. I can travel East, love, and I can travel West, In looking for that young man, the lad that I love best; The bells are all a-ringing, the sailors all ashore, And so plainly they all tell me I shall see my love no more. Oftentimes he kiss-ed me and roll’d me in his arms, Oftentimes he kissed me and rifl’d all my charms; But now you may see plainly that my love has chang’d his mind, Oh, he changes like a weathercock does change with the wind.

credits

released June 26, 2020

Produced by Ben Walker
Mastered by Tim Debney at Fluid Mastering
Artwork by Mars West

Grimdon Records

license

all rights reserved

tags

about

George Sansome Leeds, UK

George Sansome is a vibrant trad folk singer and guitarist from Worcester, UK. His relaxed stage presence and engaging delivery make for a captivating and exciting performance.
George also plays with trad English trio Granny's Attic.

contact / help

Contact George Sansome

Streaming and
Download help

Report this album or account

If you like George Sansome, you may also like: